Gateway Helping Hands

The Gateway Helping Hands logo

Gateway Helping Hands has temporarily closed their thrift shop due to COVID-19 and are seeking donations to keep their food pantry and other community efforts open.

Helping Hands is a nonprofit which gives food and other necessities to over 600 children and families weekly by delivering food to schools and apartments, collecting school supplies and coats and having backpack snack programs each Saturday for any children who need help. Their donations are funded primarily by the money they raise at the thrift shop.

“Now that we have had to close the charity shop due to the Governor’s mandate, we are seeking financial support to make up for lost income from sales,” said Wanda Fultz, executive director of Gateway Helping Hands. “We believe that God is the only source we need, and everything else is just a resource He uses to bless us.”

Donations can be made through GoFundMe, which can be found on their Facebook page, or by dropping off money or food at their office on any week day between 10 a.m. and 4:40 p.m. at 204 Morehead Plaza.

Despite the lapse in funding to their charity, the volunteers at Helping Hands are still working to get donations to the homeless and hungry, fill donation boxes, perform community outreach and give disaster relief for those who suffered the loss of a family member.

                                                       

“Families struggling to feed their children, homeless living under bridges and in abandoned buildings, food insecure veterans and the elderly all depend on us for food, clean seasonal clothing, shoes and other essentials. They are all struggling more now than ever. Hunger, poverty and total homelessness is at an all time high in Rowan County. The coronavirus has halted operations briefly, but God is certainly still in control.”

Families and individuals in need can also reach out to Helping hands for food boxes or other resources.

“For anyone, including MSU students, etcetera, who need help with food, we are more than happy to help with a food box,” said Fultz. “We are here to help. They say it takes a village. I can tell you that is true.”