• February 25, 2020

Kentucky mountains inspire local glass artist - The Trail Blazer: Life & Arts

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Kentucky mountains inspire local glass artist

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Posted: Wednesday, February 5, 2020 3:20 pm | Updated: 3:36 pm, Wed Feb 5, 2020.

The sounds of the forest inspired Debbie Weiner to create glass art.

Her studio, Glassy Mountain Art overlooks a lake in the Daniel Boone National Forest which gives her the chance see and hear wildlife while working on her art every day.

“I was trying to sell things on Etsy and it said ‘What is the name of your place,’ and off the top of my head I said ‘I live on a mountain, and I’m doing glass. Glassy. Glassy Mountain Art,’” said Weiner, who lives in Salt Lick, Ky.

Debbie Weiner
Debbie Weiner creates a stem for a glass flower using a metal rod Wednesday, January 29, 2019 in Salt Lick, Kentucky. Photo by Daneyl Tackett. by Daneyl Tackett

Weiner, a Morehead State graduate, has been working in glass for over seven years after retiring from the Adult Learning Center in Morehead.

Her retirement gave her a chance to become more invested in her art.

“The best thing is not having to get up and run like a scalded dog to get to work, so I just take my time, drink my coffee, eat my breakfast and go to my studio,” said Weiner. “I work in my glass studio, my husband says, sometimes eight to ten hours a day.”

Debbie Weiner
Debbie Weiner prepares glass for a trinket dish in her studio Wednesday, January 29, 2019 in Salt Lick, Kentucky. Photo by Daneyl Tackett. by Daneyl Tackett

Weiner started experimenting with glass art after seeing a windchime made by her twin sister, and taught herself how to make bird baths, trinket dishes and glass flowers. While the art overall is inspired by these living conditions, the colors she uses are an abstract choice.

“You know what inspires the colors? Nothing. It’s just abstract. That’s one of the things I like about it,” said Weiner.

Weiner was attracted to the idea that all pieces of glass are reusable because of the versatility of the color and shape of them.

Debbie Weiner
Debbie Weiner stands at a table in her studio Wednesday, January 29, 2019 in Salt Lick, Kentucky. Photo by Daneyl Tackett. by Daneyl Tackett

“You can never refuse to ‘re-fuse’ glass,” she said.

Though Weiner is known for creating large glass flowers, she has also worked with deer antler wind chimes, dichroic glass necklaces and hand cut bird baths, among others.

Weiner’s glass art is currently on display at the Folk-Art Center and Simply Kentucky, although she is looking for new places to share her art with others.